World War I and the medication of jazz music

Life before the First World War was more difficult than it was after the war. Before the war, women were mostly considered just housewives, if something should break, the “man” in the house would fix it and working men only worked 53 hours a week while having difficulty providing for their families; like an annual salary of $500 per week. ‘Normal’ was seen as women not having a job or not being able to vote, people who could legally drink, many teenagers going to work instead of going to school; to the point where only 2% graduated in 1900.

After the war, everything changed. People wanted to return to normality, and during that time they wanted to regain several aspects of their old lives. For example, the United States as a nation wanted the peaceful life it had before the war started; with a president who would not involve them in European wars. The quality and state of a normal life and above all; everyone wanted to go back to the quiet, non-violent life they had before the war. When everyone was trying to get back to normal, they used jazz music to help soldiers forget the killings and violence they had seen in war. Jazz took anger, grief, compassion, and the desire to change, and it turned those emotions into positive energy. Jazz had brought joy to people who had gone through dark times during the war. Music therapy had begun before World War I, but was important after World War I. When music was used in hospitals as an intervention to treat traumatic war wounds, veterans actively and passively engaged in musical activities that focused on alleviating the perception of pain.

Jazz Band on their way home from the war. Many music historians credit the music of the 369th with laying the foundations for the popularity of jazz music in France after the end of World War I.” width=”720″ height=”555″ data-ezsrcset=”https://www.argunners.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Jazz-World-War-I.jpg 720w,https://www.argunners.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Jazz-World-War-I-370×285.jpg 370w,https://www.argunners.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Jazz-World-War-I-300×231.jpg 300w” sizes=”(max-width: 720px) 100vw, 720px” ezimgfmt=”rs rscb1 src ng ngcb1 srcset” data-ezsrc=”https://www.argunners.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Jazz-World-War-I.jpg”/>
Band director Lt. James Reese Europe, far left, poses as the 369th Infantry Regiment Jazz Band on their way home from the war. Many music historians credit the music of the 369th with laying the foundations for the popularity of jazz music in France after the end of World War I.

Doctors had even noted an improvement in their outlook and felt less pain, noted an improvement in their outlook and felt less pain. The music was so well received that doctors began hiring musicians to play for the soldiers while some musicians volunteered to play. Many doctors and nurses have witnessed the effect of music on the psychological, physiological, cognitive and emotional state of veterans. People who listen to jazz music are typically 25% less depressed than non-listeners, proving that when music therapy was used on soldiers after World War I, it helped them in their depressed state of thinking. Listening to jazz has been shown to reduce the duration and intensity of general headaches and migraines. A study shows that after listening to jazz music for an hour every day for a week, the pain will decrease by 21%. Studies show that listening to jazz also improves verbal memory by increasing 60%. Listening to jazz music can also help you sleep better, promote relaxation, and inspire creativity.

World War I had changed America dramatically, and because of that, jazz came into play a big role. Jazz music wasn’t just used for dancing or listening in a speakeasy, it was used in music therapy after World War I to help war veterans, and the results of music therapy were amazing.

Ada J. Kenney