Musical ensemble – Sly Chi http://slychi.com/ Sat, 28 Aug 2021 18:08:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://slychi.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-24T191505.367-150x150.png Musical ensemble – Sly Chi http://slychi.com/ 32 32 Kerry’s rising stars put on a hell of a show http://slychi.com/kerrys-rising-stars-put-on-a-hell-of-a-show/ Sat, 28 Aug 2021 12:00:00 +0000 http://slychi.com/kerrys-rising-stars-put-on-a-hell-of-a-show/ Quiet for so long through multiple blockages, the Gleneagle INEC was once again bustling with life and music last Wednesday night as the Killarney Hall hosted four of Kerry’s best and brightest musical talents at their ‘Kerry Rising’ night. “. The event was part of INEC’s larger Inside Out series of events that has taken […]]]>

Quiet for so long through multiple blockages, the Gleneagle INEC was once again bustling with life and music last Wednesday night as the Killarney Hall hosted four of Kerry’s best and brightest musical talents at their ‘Kerry Rising’ night. “.

The event was part of INEC’s larger Inside Out series of events that has taken place in recent weeks and has seen artists such as Aslan and The High Kings perform there.

Last Wednesday however, the focus was only on some of the outstanding local talent we have in the Kingdom and the near-full crowd was treated to a wonderful mix of upbeat and intimate music, soulful from Seamus Harty of Tralee, Lorraine Nash of Lyreacrompane, Colin de Beaufort Andrew and last but not least, Cathal Flaherty of Killarney.

After so long in lockdown darkness, it was fitting that for what were almost everyone’s first shows in over 18 months, the weather gods saw fit to make the sun shine for this.

At an MC’d party by Brendan Fuller, the first on stage was 20-year-old Séamus Harty, who in addition to making the crowd jealous with his tales of a summer spent living and doing the streets in Rome, set the standard for the night. , some songs were only written the day before.

Then Colin Andrew, who if he ever decides to pack music (which judging by his talent, he certainly shouldn’t do) can easily forge a career as a standing actor, such was his ability to have the crowd in the stitches between songs.

Following two great acts in Séamus and Colin isn’t easy, but Lorraine Nash was certainly up to the task as the multi-instrumentalist wowed audiences as she switched from keyboard to guitar with her renditions of her original songs “Changing Tides “and” Wolves to name a few.

Finally, to end the evening, Cathal Flaherty of Killarney, already such a well-known performer in the Kingdom, was not in the least bit disappointed as he last performed as a solo singer / songwriter before. to start a new group project in January of next year.

The evening would not have been complete without an ensemble performance and the Kerry Quartet duly delivered a lively rendition of “The Auld Triangle” together to end the evening on a high note.


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Tri-Valley Local School District Marching Band trains for OMEA http://slychi.com/tri-valley-local-school-district-marching-band-trains-for-omea/ Wed, 25 Aug 2021 08:29:08 +0000 http://slychi.com/tri-valley-local-school-district-marching-band-trains-for-omea/ DRESDE – Lined up on the training ground outside the school district office late Monday afternoon, the Three Valley Marching Band stood at attention, staring ahead as they awaited instructions from their commanders ground. The 89-degree summer heat devastated the musical army of nearly 100 students in grades 8-12 as their conductors counted them. That’s […]]]>

DRESDE – Lined up on the training ground outside the school district office late Monday afternoon, the Three Valley Marching Band stood at attention, staring ahead as they awaited instructions from their commanders ground.

The 89-degree summer heat devastated the musical army of nearly 100 students in grades 8-12 as their conductors counted them. That’s when the drums came in dreamy, the hallmark of the 2021 show – and the band came to life.

Although it wasn’t long before Amanda Blevins, director of the district’s eight school and extracurricular groups, stopped the group.

“It’s time to start over,” she announced into a megaphone as the ensemble abandoned their performance positions and rushed to their starting points, closely aligned with their band mates.


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New tour of Marc Anthony, actress Cristela Alonzo, film ‘Candyman’ http://slychi.com/new-tour-of-marc-anthony-actress-cristela-alonzo-film-candyman/ Mon, 23 Aug 2021 09:13:21 +0000 http://slychi.com/new-tour-of-marc-anthony-actress-cristela-alonzo-film-candyman/ Concert: Marc Anthony kicking off his Pa’lla Voy tour in San Antonio – the biggest spectacle to hit the city since COVID shutdown almost a year and a half ago. Salsa superstar with a record 32 No.1 song on Billboard’s Latin Tropical Airplay chart, Anthony rose to mainstream pop success with his self-titled 1999 album […]]]>

Concert: Marc Anthony kicking off his Pa’lla Voy tour in San Antonio – the biggest spectacle to hit the city since COVID shutdown almost a year and a half ago. Salsa superstar with a record 32 No.1 song on Billboard’s Latin Tropical Airplay chart, Anthony rose to mainstream pop success with his self-titled 1999 album and Top 10 hits “I Need to Know” and “You. Sang to Me. ” Friday 8 p.m., AT&T Center, 1 AT&T Parkway in East Houston Street. $ 65 to $ 285, attcenter.com. Face masks are mandatory for all people 10 years of age or older.

Theater: Linda Kaufman, the talented stage artist behind the show ‘Senior Moments’, has a new creation produced by her new company, Real Life Productions Inc. “Mrs. Rosenberg’s Christmas” is a musical about an elderly Jewish woman who sends her family into chaos when they decree that they want to celebrate in August. Opens Thursday. 7:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. August 29, Cellar Theater, The Public Theater of San Antonio, San Pedro at Ashby. $ 25, reallifeproductions.org.

Cristela Alonzo

Michael S. Schwartz / Getty Images

Comedy: Actor Cristela Alonzo was the first Latina to create, perform, and write prime-time comedy. His groundbreaking sitcom “Cristela,” based in part on his life, ran for one season on ABC starting in 2014. His latest creative endeavor is a memoir, “Music to My Years,” which will be released in October. 8 p.m. Thursday, 7:30 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. Friday, 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Saturday, Laugh Out Loud Comedy Club, 618 NW Loop 410. $ 50 to $ 200 for tables for two, four or eight, improvtx.com/sanantonio.

Movie: Someone must have said his name. “Candy”, the 1992 cult horror classic about an urban legend haunting a Chicago housing project returns in this sequel co-written and produced by “Get Out” director Jordan Peele. Tony Todd returns as the killer title character. Opening Friday in cinemas.

Classical music: The Agarita The chamber ensemble will perform in the Great Hall of the San Antonio Art Museum, performing works inspired by the must-see exhibit “America’s Impressionism: Echoes of a Revolution”. Masks are strongly encouraged. 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, SAMA, 200 W. Jones Ave. Free. Info, agarita.org.

Album: Pop star Halsey, known for songs such as “Without Me” as well as collaborations with Chainsmokers and Benny Blanco, goes a little dark on her new album, “If I can’t have love, I want power.” It was produced by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross of Nine Inch Nails. Available Friday.


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The Recorder – Barbès in the Woods makes Montague a world stage http://slychi.com/the-recorder-barbes-in-the-woods-makes-montague-a-world-stage/ Sun, 22 Aug 2021 19:04:36 +0000 http://slychi.com/the-recorder-barbes-in-the-woods-makes-montague-a-world-stage/ MONTAGUE – The Barbès in the Woods music festival made the small town of Montague the center of the world on Saturday. The a musical program of global influence which marked the day’s festivities between previous precipitation and impending Hurricane Henri. Cloudy skies and mid-1980s heat did little to dampen the festival, as the location […]]]>

MONTAGUE – The Barbès in the Woods music festival made the small town of Montague the center of the world on Saturday.

The a musical program of global influence which marked the day’s festivities between previous precipitation and impending Hurricane Henri. Cloudy skies and mid-1980s heat did little to dampen the festival, as the location of Bartlett Farm saw its vast field crushed by hundreds of dancing feet.

The farm installation consisted of two stages – the Field Stage and the Grove Stage – which participants could alternate from at the end of the sets. Several food trucks and other vendors have set up on both sides of the field. The cove at the back of the site was lined with loudspeakers playing music and a sign inviting people to splash around and cool off.

Edo Mor, festival talent buyer and master of ceremonies for Laudable Productions, said he had high hopes for attendance, compared to the number of people Barbès in the Woods drew in 2019.

“We expected it to be twice as full and twice as full,” said Mor. “It’s incredibly encouraging to have an attendance that exceeds expectations for music that people have never heard before. ”

It is this theme of curiosity and foreign attraction that made the festival so special. Barbès in the Woods was inspired by Barbes, the bar in South Brooklyn, NY, which has proudly hosted internationally diverse live music since it opened in 2003. Kyle Homestead, Founder and Impresario of Laudable Productions, said the The main goal was to juxtapose international relevance with the small town vibe of Montague to “bring as much magic to the nooks and crannies (of the region) as possible”.

Robyn O’Brien, a Plainfield resident who attended the inaugural Barbes in the Woods 2019 festival, said Mor did a great job sculpting the identity of the event.

“I love everything he brings to the valley in terms of world music,” said O’Brien. “I like the performers. They are original and wonderful.

Gyan Riley, a member of artist Arooj Aftab’s Vulture Prince ensemble, said the outdoor nature of the festival is especially exciting for him as someone who has enjoyed performing at Barbes in Brooklyn countless times.

“It’s just a really wonderful way to hear this music,” said Riley.

Another member of the ensemble, Darian Thomas, said such a congregation was particularly significant given how the COVID-19 pandemic made such gatherings difficult.

“It all feels like an exercise in perseverance and perseverance,” said Thomas. “I think it’s really beautiful.”

“It’s really cool. I haven’t really done a lot of outdoor festivals,” Aftab said. “We’re really, really thankful to be able to play again.”

Some participants, regardless of location and connection to the city, relished the sense of community that could be fostered in such a place.

“It’s your woodland festival crowd,” said Aftab, a Brooklyn resident. “It’s really cold. Our music is like that too, you know?

“I really like the sense of community,” said Kiana Garvey, a Boston resident. “I just saw two people kissing and it was really amazing, especially because of the pandemic.”

Even though the festival attracts people from all over the world, the organizers made a point of emphasizing that the local community deserves its own love.

“The community here is really important to us,” Homestead said.

Contact Julian Mendoza at 413-772-0261, ext. 261 or jmendoza@recorder.com.


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Return of “Mariachi Masses” to Arizona Cathedral http://slychi.com/return-of-mariachi-masses-to-arizona-cathedral/ Sun, 22 Aug 2021 08:51:01 +0000 http://slychi.com/return-of-mariachi-masses-to-arizona-cathedral/ TUCSON, Arizona – After more than a year of silence due to the pandemic, mariachis once again perform Sunday services at St. Augustine’s Cathedral in Tucson, where the colorful and sonorous tradition dates back half a century and merges Roman Catholicism with Mexican Americans Pride. For the hundreds of worshipers gathered in the Spanish Colonial […]]]>

TUCSON, Arizona – After more than a year of silence due to the pandemic, mariachis once again perform Sunday services at St. Augustine’s Cathedral in Tucson, where the colorful and sonorous tradition dates back half a century and merges Roman Catholicism with Mexican Americans Pride.

For the hundreds of worshipers gathered in the Spanish Colonial Church, and for other congregations across the southwest, the unique sound of the Mariachi liturgy is more than just another version of the choir. It evokes an identity of border countries where spirituality and folk music have mingled for centuries.

“Syncretism is the reality of this land, the ‘ambos’ reality,” said Reverend Alan Valencia, rector of the cathedral, who grew up attending mariachi mass in “ambos Nogales”, or “the two Nogales” , as those in the region refer to the two cities of the same name straddling the US-Mexico border about 60 miles to the south.

“And that’s what we see in these mariachi masses,” he added. “Faith and culture come together and grow.”

[Video not showing up above? Click here to watch » arkansasonline.com/822mariachis/]

Mariachi forms the soundtrack of everyday life in border areas, accompanying everything from backyard barbecues to coming-of-age parties to weddings and funerals.

Yet while mariachi is a grassroots genre popular, musicians and parishioners say its emotional interplay of trumpet, violin, guitar, vihuela, and guitarron is a natural complement to sacred rites.

“The mass itself is a reminder that it is not just mariachis that are served at the table in a cantina,” said Alberto Ranjel, who has been playing at the cathedral since the age of 9 and who directs now the ensemble founded by his father, Mariachi. Tapatio. “It’s a representation of my culture.”

Worshiper Leilani Gomez echoed this sentiment, saying, “They bring mass culture and art, as well as the presence of God. They make you feel the presence of God.”

The first canon of the Mariachi Mass was composed in Cuernavaca, Mexico, after the Vatican encouraged the incorporation of regional musical traditions into services in the 1960s. Called Misa Panamericana, or Pan American Mass, it features a specific order. instrumental arrangements, sung prayers and hymns, according to Dan Sheehy, director and curator of Smithsonian Folkways Recordings.

At that time in the United States, the Chicano civil rights movement was in full swing, and Mariachi musicians transformed from folk troubadours into cultural heroes, “symbols of Mexican identity reinforced here due to multiculturalism.” Sheehy added.

Hundreds of Mariachi school programs followed in the 1970s, when music began to be written instead of being taught through lyric training, said George Bejarano, who in 1973 began performing with the youth group Los Changuitos Feos, or “the ugly little monkeys”. and whose family has lived in border areas “since before there were borders”. In addition, female musicians began to join traditionally male ensembles.

The mainstays of the Mariachi Mass include the merry “Pescador de Hombres” or “Fisherman of Men” – the Spanish-speaking equivalent of “Amazing Grace” for its popularity and ubiquity – and a rendition of the 19th century classic by Franz Schubert “Ave Maria.”

Alma Mccune 15, and other members of the Los Changuitos Feos (Ugly Little Monkeys) mariachi band prepare for parishioners after an early morning mass at St. Augustine Cathedral on Sunday, August 18, 2021 in downtown Tucson. (AP Photo / Darryl Webb)

Mariachi Los Changuitos Feos (Ugly Little Monkeys) members Cameron Davison 18 and Roman Murillo 14 play their trumpets during morning mass at St. Augustine Cathedral on Sunday, August 18, 2021 in downtown Tucson.  (AP Photo / Darryl Webb)

Mariachi Los Changuitos Feos (Ugly Little Monkeys) members Cameron Davison 18 and Roman Murillo 14 play their trumpets during morning mass at St. Augustine Cathedral on Sunday, August 18, 2021 in downtown Tucson. (AP Photo / Darryl Webb)

The Los Changuitos Feos (Ugly Little Monkeys) mariachi band prepare for parishioners during an early morning mass at St. Augustine's Cathedral on Sunday, August 18, 2021 in downtown Tucson.  While mariachi is a popular genre at its core, musicians and parishioners say its emotional interplay between trumpet, violin, guitar, vihuela, and guitarrón is a natural complement to the sacred rites of Mass.  (AP Photo / Darryl Webb)

The Los Changuitos Feos (Ugly Little Monkeys) mariachi band prepare for parishioners during an early morning mass at St. Augustine’s Cathedral on Sunday, August 18, 2021 in downtown Tucson. While mariachi is a popular genre at its core, musicians and parishioners say its emotional interplay between trumpet, violin, guitar, vihuela, and guitarrón is a natural complement to the sacred rites of Mass. (AP Photo / Darryl Webb)

Parishioners of St. Augustine Cathedral watch and listen to mariachi band Los Changuitos Feos (Ugly Little Monkeys) perform for them on Sunday, August 18, 2021 in downtown Tucson.  While mariachi is a popular genre at its core, musicians and parishioners say its emotional interplay between trumpet, violin, guitar, vihuela, and guitarrón is a natural complement to the sacred rites of Mass.  (AP Photo / Darryl Webb)

Parishioners of St. Augustine Cathedral watch and listen to mariachi band Los Changuitos Feos (Ugly Little Monkeys) perform for them on Sunday, August 18, 2021 in downtown Tucson. While mariachi is a popular genre at its core, musicians and parishioners say its emotional interplay between trumpet, violin, guitar, vihuela, and guitarrón is a natural complement to the sacred rites of Mass. (AP Photo / Darryl Webb)

After a long absence from the rector of St. Augustine's Cathedral in Tucson, Reverend Alan Valencia once again welcomes the Mariachi band Los Changuitos Feos (Ugly Little Monkeys) as they prepare to perform at their morning mass on Sunday August 18, 2021 in downtown Tucson.  “Syncretism is the reality of this land, the 'ambos' reality,” says Valencia, the Cathedral & # x2019; s rector, who grew up attending Mariachi Mass - ambos Nogales, & # x201d;  or “the two Nogales,” as locals refer to the two towns of the same name straddling the US-Mexico border about 60 miles (100 kilometers) to the south.  (AP Photo / Darryl Webb)

After a long absence from the rector of St. Augustine’s Cathedral in Tucson, Reverend Alan Valencia once again welcomes the Mariachi band Los Changuitos Feos (Ugly Little Monkeys) as they prepare to perform at their morning mass on Sunday August 18, 2021 in downtown Tucson. “Syncretism is the reality of this land, the ‘ambos’ reality,” says Valencia, the Cathedral & # x2019; s rector, who grew up attending Mariachi Mass – ambos Nogales, & # x201d; or “the two Nogales,” as locals refer to the two towns of the same name straddling the US-Mexico border about 60 miles (100 kilometers) to the south. (AP Photo / Darryl Webb)

Los Changuitos Feos (Ugly Little Monkeys) Mariachi band members read sheet music from

Members of the Mariachi band from Los Changuitos Feos (Ugly Little Monkeys) read sheet music from “Ave Maria” during a performance for parishioners at morning mass at St. Augustine Cathedral on Sunday August 18, 2021 in the center city ​​of Tucson. The first canon of the Mariachi Mass was composed in Cuernavaca, Mexico, after the Vatican encouraged the incorporation of regional musical traditions into services in the 1960s. Called Misa Panamericana, or Pan American Mass, it features a specific order. instrumental arrangements, sung prayers and hymns, according to Dan Sheehy, director and curator of Smithsonian Folkways Recordings. (AP Photo / Darryl Webb)

After morning mass, Mariachi band Los Changuitos Feos (Ugly Little Monkeys) perform for parishioners outside in the courtyard of St. Augustine Cathedral on Sunday, August 18, 2021 in downtown Tucson.  For the hundreds of worshipers gathered in this Spanish colonial church, and other congregations across the southwest, the unique sound of the mariachi liturgy is more than just another version of the choir.  It evokes an identity of border countries where spirituality and folk music have mingled for centuries.  (AP Photo / Darryl Webb)

After morning mass, Mariachi band Los Changuitos Feos (Ugly Little Monkeys) perform for parishioners outside in the courtyard of St. Augustine Cathedral on Sunday, August 18, 2021 in downtown Tucson. For the hundreds of worshipers gathered in this Spanish colonial church, and other congregations across the southwest, the unique sound of the mariachi liturgy is more than just another version of the choir. It evokes an identity of border countries where spirituality and folk music have mingled for centuries. (AP Photo / Darryl Webb)

The Los Changuitos Feos (Ugly Little Monkeys) mariachi band prepare for parishioners during an early morning mass at St. Augustine's Cathedral on Sunday, August 18, 2021 in downtown Tucson.  In the 1960s in the United States, the Chicano civil rights movement was in full swing and Mariachi musicians transformed from folk troubadours into cultural heroes,

The Los Changuitos Feos (Ugly Little Monkeys) mariachi band prepare for parishioners during an early morning mass at St. Augustine’s Cathedral on Sunday, August 18, 2021 in downtown Tucson. In the 1960s in the United States, the Chicano civil rights movement was in full swing and Mariachi musicians transformed from folk troubadours into cultural heroes, “symbols of Mexican identity emphasized here due to multiculturalism”; according to Dan Sheehy, director and curator of Smithsonian Folkways Recordings. (AP Photo / Darryl Webb)

Members of the Los Changuitos Feos (Ugly Little Monkeys) mariachi band Roman Murillo 14 and Cameron Davison 18 play their trumpets during morning mass at St. Augustine Cathedral on Sunday, August 18, 2021 in downtown Tucson.  After more than a year of silence due to the pandemic, the mariachis replay Sunday services at the cathedral, where the colorful and sonorous tradition dates back half a century and fuses Roman Catholicism with Mexican-American pride.  (AP Photo / Darryl Webb)

Members of the Los Changuitos Feos (Ugly Little Monkeys) mariachi band Roman Murillo 14 and Cameron Davison 18 play their trumpets during morning mass at St. Augustine Cathedral on Sunday, August 18, 2021 in downtown Tucson. After more than a year of silence due to the pandemic, the mariachis replay Sunday services at the cathedral, where the colorful and sonorous tradition dates back half a century and fuses Roman Catholicism with Mexican-American pride. (AP Photo / Darryl Webb)


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Stephen Wilkinson, composer and conductor with a rare poetic vision that made the BBC Northern Singers one of the best choirs – obituary http://slychi.com/stephen-wilkinson-composer-and-conductor-with-a-rare-poetic-vision-that-made-the-bbc-northern-singers-one-of-the-best-choirs-obituary/ Wed, 11 Aug 2021 12:27:00 +0000 http://slychi.com/stephen-wilkinson-composer-and-conductor-with-a-rare-poetic-vision-that-made-the-bbc-northern-singers-one-of-the-best-choirs-obituary/ Although he championed the music of others, commissioning works from Wilfrid Mellers, Richard Rodney Bennett and William Walton, he was also an accomplished composer in his own right. A selection of his songs, written over 80 years, was released in 2017 on a CD titled The Sunlight on the Garden, its title coming from the […]]]>

Although he championed the music of others, commissioning works from Wilfrid Mellers, Richard Rodney Bennett and William Walton, he was also an accomplished composer in his own right. A selection of his songs, written over 80 years, was released in 2017 on a CD titled The Sunlight on the Garden, its title coming from the dark lyricism of his setting to music of a war poem by Louis MacNeice.

Although thorough in his musical preparation, Wilkinson could at times be spectacularly impulsive. He once used the few hours between rehearsal and the concert to climb Helvellyn in the Lake District, while on another occasion, when a family camping vacation coincided with a concert, he came out of his tent ready to go. conduct in full evening dress.

Stephen Austin Wilkinson was born at Old Rectory in Great Eversden, six miles southwest of Cambridge, on April 29, 1919, the second of three sons of Rev. Gordon Wilkinson, MC, TD, and his wife Marion (née Corke) .

He was sent to Christ Church, Oxford, as a chorister under William Harris and educated at St Edward’s School, Oxford. While there, he took some composition lessons with Sir Thomas Armstrong, who succeeded Harris in Christ Church in 1933. Returning to Cambridge in 1937, Wilkinson, then an accomplished pianist, obtained an organ scholarship at Queens’ College.

During the war Wilkinson served in the Royal Navy, first in Atlantic convoys. He then spent two years as a demining officer aboard the requisitioned trawler Northman in the Faroe Islands. In 1943 he was transferred to HMS Vernon, a torpedo school and experimental facility at Roedean School, near Brighton, but was invalidated after an explosion while securing a German mine, one of many captured on a barge in Antwerp.

Surgeons fought for months to restore partial use of his right hand. He has recovered sufficiently that he will resume playing the piano, but not the organ as he might have wished. In August 1944, he was mentioned in dispatches for his “courage and unwavering devotion to duty”.

Returning to university, Wilkinson completed his musical studies and in 1947 was appointed principal of the Hertfordshire Rural Music School in Hitchin. He has also conducted the Hertford Choir, conducting it in many exceptional concerts across the region.

The choir celebrated the Festival of Britain in 1951 by commissioning Cutty Sark, a setting to music of Hart Crane’s poem for voice, strings, piano and percussion by conductor Antony Hopkins, with Wilkinson directing its first performance.


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Super Quartet with Piano Postlude http://slychi.com/super-quartet-with-piano-postlude/ Mon, 09 Aug 2021 14:10:37 +0000 http://slychi.com/super-quartet-with-piano-postlude/ Formed by Juilliard students in 2008, and active ever since, the wonderful Tesla Quartet finally made their Maverick Concerts yesterday, 13 years later. Management should not waste time re-engaging them. Some string quartets carry on a conversation between four musicians, while others seek a 16-string unit. The Tesla Quartet has embarked on Haydn’s Quartet in […]]]>

Formed by Juilliard students in 2008, and active ever since, the wonderful Tesla Quartet finally made their Maverick Concerts yesterday, 13 years later. Management should not waste time re-engaging them.

Some string quartets carry on a conversation between four musicians, while others seek a 16-string unit. The Tesla Quartet has embarked on Haydn’s Quartet in C major, Op. 76, no. 3, the “Emperor”, which immediately shows that the Tesla seeks unity and achieves it extremely well. The balances were practically perfect and the folk dance segment in the development of the first movement sounded appropriately. Plus, we got to hear it twice, as the players gave us both the exposure and the development / recap rehearsals in this move, something we hardly ever hear. Principal violinist Ross Snyder explained after the concert, “There’s more material in there. We have to play it. I agree, but most quartets don’t.

Caroline shaw Plan and elevation: the lands of Dumbarton musically describes the famous domain for which Stravinsky wrote his Dumbarton Oaks Concerto. Shaw is an interesting composer and Pulitzer Prize winner, but this example ranged from captivating to bland. Beethoven and Debussy’s devious quotes from Shaw testified to lively musical skill. There is a lot of pizzicato in it Dumbarton, including some weirdly appealing effects; these passages showed the impressive precision of the group.

There was also a lot of weirdly tight ensemble work in Schubert’s String Quartet in G major, D. 887, his last. But that was not the most remarkable aspect of the memorable performance. This quartet perfectly integrated the remarkable innovations of Schubert’s writing, the rapid changes of emotion back and forth, the long expansions of long ideas, the way in which terror sometimes lurks behind pleasure. I really liked the tempo of the second movement, just a little faster than usual, not enough to feel rushed but enough to honor the “moto” in Schubert’s indication “Andante un poco moto”. The wide range of dynamics in the finale helped convey the impact of the music, and their subtle acceleration heightened the emotions.

Adam Tendler (file photo)

Pianist Adam Tendler returned to the Maverick with a substantial postlude. Although the string quartet part was quite long, most of the audience stayed. Tendler has shown himself to Maverick before, as a specialist in contemporary music, but this time he opened with a beautiful and sensitive version of Schubert’s Allegretto in C minor, D. 915, including all of its covers.

Without a break, Tendler then embarked on Julius Eastman’s Piano 2. This black composer tragically passed away in 1990, many of his scores have been lost, but recently he has undergone a major revival and re-evaluation. Listening to Eastman on YouTube, I can understand what it is at least in part. Piano 2 unfolded like a somewhat episodic improvisation, sometimes fascinating, sometimes just fulfilling. Tendler’s subtle form made it the best it could be.

To conclude his mini-recital, Tendler took on one of the great challenges of the piano repertoire, Stravinsky’s Three Movements from Petrushka, written for Artur Rubinstein. (A live performance by Rubinstein recently appeared on the internet.) For years, Alexis Weissenberg’s recording has set the standard; I heard him reproduce this achievement in concert. From a remark from Tendler, it seems he is new to this work. He played with excellent musical comprehension, but resorted to relatively slow tempos and tricks like giving himself extra time to do difficult jumps. The audience ate it, but I’m overwhelmed to hear better takes. I hope Tendler’s repetitive and boring reminder wasn’t written by someone I love. Philip Glass maybe?

Leslie Gerber, who lives in Woodstock, New York, has been a professional critic since 1966, for places such as Performance today, Fanfare, and Amazon.com. He also publishes the Parnassus Records label.


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Grammy winners presented to Bravo! Big Sky Concert Series – Explore Big Sky http://slychi.com/grammy-winners-presented-to-bravo-big-sky-concert-series-explore-big-sky/ Fri, 06 Aug 2021 21:43:58 +0000 http://slychi.com/grammy-winners-presented-to-bravo-big-sky-concert-series-explore-big-sky/ GREAT SKY ARTS COUNCIL BIG SKY – The Big Sky Arts Council is pleased to present the 10e Annual congratulations! Big Sky Music Festival in downtown Big Sky on August 13-14. The festival, formerly known as Big Sky Classical Music Festival, brings together some of the best classical and crossover musicians in Big Sky for […]]]>

GREAT SKY ARTS COUNCIL

BIG SKY – The Big Sky Arts Council is pleased to present the 10e Annual congratulations! Big Sky Music Festival in downtown Big Sky on August 13-14. The festival, formerly known as Big Sky Classical Music Festival, brings together some of the best classical and crossover musicians in Big Sky for two nights of world-class performances.

The festival kicks off with a paid concert at the Warren Miller Performing Arts Center on Friday August 13, featuring an intimate concert by Angella Ahn and her friends. This star string ensemble will perform the famous Mendelssohn Octet, as well as pieces by Kenji Bunch and Caroline Shaw. The group includes the following musicians: Angella Ahn (violin), Eugena Chang (cello), Britton Riley (cello), Yvonne Lam (viola), Grammy winner (viola), Carrie Krause (violin), Pico Alt (violin) ), Chi-Chi Lin Bestmann (viola) and Emilie-Anne Gendron (violin). Tickets for this show are on sale now and can be purchased at warrenmillerpac.org.

“This is a group of world-class musicians who have come together just for this concert,” said Brian Hurlbut, Executive Director of ACBS. “They will play an intimate concert at WMPAC and then join the orchestra on Saturday. We are delighted to have them.

On Saturday there will be a free concert at Len Hill Park in the Big Sky Town Center. The first will be a performance by the Big Sky Festival String Orchestra, playing pieces by Mozart, LeClair, Kilar, Walker and Grieg, with guest soloist Angella Ahn. The orchestra will again be led by Peter Bay, who is the musical director and conductor of the Austin Symphony Orchestra. Maestro Bay has performed with over 80 different orchestras around the world. In 1994, he was one of two conductors selected to participate in the Leonard Bernstein American Conductors Program. He was the first prize winner of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Young Conductors Competition in 1980 and a winner of the Leopold Stokowski Competition in 1987 sponsored by the American Symphony Orchestra. He was inducted into the Austin Arts Hall of Fame in May 2016.

Saturday’s performance will close with FUTUREMAN / SILVERMAN, a far-reaching musical conversation between two of the world’s most eclectic and adventurous musicians. Roy “Futureman” Wooten is a five-time Grammy-winner percussionist, founding member of Bela Fleck and the Flecktones, composer, inventor, innovator and a very endearing personality. His musical explorations continue to explore the confines of the musical world. Dubbed “the greatest living representative of the electric violin” by the BBC, Tracy Silverman is the world’s first concert electric violinist.

He went to Juilliard School in hopes of becoming the next Jascha Heifetz, but left wanting to be the next Jimi Hendrix, and was recently named by Juilliard as one of its top 100 graduates. His groundbreaking work with the 6-string electric violin has led to collaborations with the world’s greatest composers and premieres at Carnegie Hall. The combination of the two is explosive. Using electronics, live loops and spontaneous musical interaction, they create soundscapes and grooves that will have you looking for other members of this duo. The trip covers rock, jazz, Latin and Asian grooves and includes “derangements” of electric violin concertos, original works and famous everything from Bach to Hendrix.

“This is the tenth anniversary of the festival,” said Hurlbut, “and we think we have some great lineup that will appeal to everyone.”

For more information about the festival, please visit bigskyarts.org.


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We will remember Judy Brandt – musical director, founder of the theater company – August 21 | Cambridge News / Deerfield Independent http://slychi.com/we-will-remember-judy-brandt-musical-director-founder-of-the-theater-company-august-21-cambridge-news-deerfield-independent/ Fri, 06 Aug 2021 14:00:00 +0000 http://slychi.com/we-will-remember-judy-brandt-musical-director-founder-of-the-theater-company-august-21-cambridge-news-deerfield-independent/ Judy Brandt conducts the Bel Canto Women’s Choir during their concert on December 2, 2018 at Grace Lutheran Church in Cambridge. The concert featured the Men of Blackhawk Choir and a quintet, and was included in Classic Christmas. Madeline Westberg Making music has always been Judy Brandt’s life. And so, when the community comes together […]]]>






Judy Brandt conducts the Bel Canto Women’s Choir during their concert on December 2, 2018 at Grace Lutheran Church in Cambridge. The concert featured the Men of Blackhawk Choir and a quintet, and was included in Classic Christmas.



Making music has always been Judy Brandt’s life.

And so, when the community comes together later this month to celebrate his life, the music will rightly be headlining the occasion.






Judy Brandt

Judy Brandt




The child who fell in love with the piano and the trombone, who, after graduating from Cambridge High School in 1961, embarked on a career in music education, first as a conductor, then as a longtime choir director at Deerfield High School, and the retired founder of The Cambridge Deerfield Players Theater will be recalled at 1 p.m. on August 21 at DHS.






Judy Brandt

Judy Brandt




Brandt’s family held a private funeral after his death on October 25, 2020; this event is an opportunity for the public to pay tribute to him. It will be followed by a dessert reception.

Preparations for the music sharing on August 21 are underway. This Saturday, August 7 at 9 a.m. at Grace Lutheran Church in Cambridge, a community choir that will sing during the event will hold its first rehearsal. Anyone wishing to participate is welcome.

Brandt has also been a longtime music director and choir director at Grace Lutheran Church, as well as director of other choirs in the area including the Bel Canto Women’s Choir, Men of Blackhawk and Country Chordsmen.

And long after her retirement, she continued to be involved in the musical productions of Deerfield High School and to accompany local music students in solo and ensemble competitions.

Brandt was born August 20, 1943 to Ardie and Mabel (Finby) Eide and raised on a farm in Cambridge. She began playing the piano and trombone in elementary school and as a teenager began playing the organ at St. Paul’s Liberty Lutheran Church in Deerfield.

She went on to receive degrees in vocal and instrumental music education from St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota, then worked as an orchestral and choir director in Hudson, Randolph and Fort Atkinson. Finally, she returned to Deerfield, where she spent 25 years as the high school choir director before retiring in 2002.

Brandt’s daughter, Sara Cerar, said it was “super important” to her mother that the Cambridge Deerfield Players Theater, the local theater group she founded shortly after her retirement, had both Cambridge and Deerfield in its title, given its long-standing ties to both communities.






Judy Brandt




Cerar said the hope for August 21 is to highlight different periods in her mother’s life and how music fits into them. Some of Brandt’s former music students and choir members are expected to speak.

In addition to music, Cerar said her mother’s main goals in life are her children and grandchildren.

“We were important; we were his people, ”Cerar said.

Deanne Herrling is the current Chair of the Cambridge Deerfield Players Theater Board of Directors. It organizes two summer shows every year, one with a cast of adults and the other with a cast of children. Herrling worked alongside Brandt for almost 15 years to put on these shows.






Judy Brandt









Judy Brandt




“Watching her order a cast and do a show from start to finish was basically magical for me,” Herrling said. “I am fortunate to have been with her, to have learned so much, for many years.”

“If I could talk to Judy, I would thank her for everything. It was amazing, and I think she will always be with us.

The 2022 CD Players Theater adult and children’s shows, Adams Family and Frozen, Jr., will be produced in memory of Brandt, Herrling said.

“Judy has played such an important role in the life of my family,” said Lisa Moen, also a member of the CD Players Theater board of directors. Moen’s three children grew up playing with the CD Players Theater and in musicals at Deerfield High School under the direction of Brandt.

“She helped bring out their love of music and their love of performance, giving them confidence in themselves and in their ability to do it and be able to have fun with it,” Moen said.

Her older children continued to play into adulthood, she said.

“It affected them in all different aspects of their lives,” she said.

CD Players Theater board member Joanne Matheson said upon Brandt’s death “we have lost a good friend and a great mentor to our children”.

“I was delighted to be associated with the CD Players Theater and to work with Judy. We can never fill these shoes. We will try to be everything she expects of us.

In the future, said Matheson, the CD Players Theater may better honor Brandt by continuing to “encourage all children to take a chance and surprise themselves with their hidden talents.”






Judy Brandt









Judy Brandt




“There is so much I could say about Judy; I don’t even know where to start, ”said Betsy Bamlett, CD Players Theater board member, recalling singing as a teenager with Brandt’s daughter Bethany in the high school choir. Deerfield.

“I’ve known Judy for what seems like forever,” Bamlett said.

“In my adult life, Judy became more of a friend,” Bamlett said, fondly recalling the musical rehearsals, late night food stops after rehearsals, and Sunday afternoon choir rehearsals. . “When she asked me many years ago to play for the men’s choir, I was honored. I got to a point where I could ALMOST guess what she was thinking.

Bamlett said Brandt instilled a love for music and theater in his daughter, who is currently studying music.

“I will miss our long conversations about anything and everything,” Bamlett said. “Thinking of going into a musical season without it makes me sad. I hope her legacy will live on forever and I hope that we as CD players can continue to do things that make her proud.

A memorial fund in Brandt’s name has been established at the Bank of Deerfield with the aim of creating musical opportunities for communities in the area. Contributions can be sent to the Bank of Deerfield, 15 S. Main Street, Deerfield, WI 53531.


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Tampa Bay Area High School Music Camps March and Play Again http://slychi.com/tampa-bay-area-high-school-music-camps-march-and-play-again/ Tue, 03 Aug 2021 08:28:00 +0000 http://slychi.com/tampa-bay-area-high-school-music-camps-march-and-play-again/ LUTZ, Fla – Daniel “Chip” Wood is a man who generally expects his bands to be some of the best in Tampa Bay. But this year, as he leads the Marching Warrior Brigade at Steinbrenner High School, the teacher’s expectations are different. The pandemic has also taken its toll on the marching bands. “These kids […]]]>

LUTZ, Fla – Daniel “Chip” Wood is a man who generally expects his bands to be some of the best in Tampa Bay.

But this year, as he leads the Marching Warrior Brigade at Steinbrenner High School, the teacher’s expectations are different.

The pandemic has also taken its toll on the marching bands.

“These kids haven’t had a regular music camp since fall 2019,” says Wood. “About half of the marching band program did not participate in a normal marching band year.”

For freshmen and sophomores, the band members are strangers in strange musical lands. They will need to quickly learn to be part of a walking musical ensemble.

But that’s what group camp is for. This allows the members to get rid of the rust and get into a groove.

A little over a week before the first day of class, school gymnasiums, cafeterias and grounds are filled with music.

Sophia, senior member of Steinbrenner’s talented colorguard, says this group camp is tough but also pretty cool.

“So this year they’re throwing it all at us, and it’s like it’s back to normal,” she says. “It’s fun, and there are a lot of connections, and it’s pretty awesome actually.”

To know the program of the next performances of the Steinbrenner Marching Warrior Brigade, Click here.


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