Jazz band – Sly Chi http://slychi.com/ Sat, 28 Aug 2021 18:07:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://slychi.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-24T191505.367-150x150.png Jazz band – Sly Chi http://slychi.com/ 32 32 Raffle aims to boost support for MPAartfest | news / fairfax http://slychi.com/raffle-aims-to-boost-support-for-mpaartfest-news-fairfax/ Sat, 28 Aug 2021 16:15:00 +0000 http://slychi.com/raffle-aims-to-boost-support-for-mpaartfest-news-fairfax/ [Sun Gazette Newspapers provides content to, but otherwise is unaffiliated with, InsideNoVa or Rappahannock Media LLC.] The McLean Project for the Arts (MPA) invites the public to purchase tickets for an artistic raffle that will take place during its MPAartfest celebration night on Friday, September 10. This artistic and fun evening gives guests a unique insight […]]]>

[Sun Gazette Newspapers provides content to, but otherwise is unaffiliated with, InsideNoVa or Rappahannock Media LLC.]

The McLean Project for the Arts (MPA) invites the public to purchase tickets for an artistic raffle that will take place during its MPAartfest celebration night on Friday, September 10.

This artistic and fun evening gives guests a unique insight into MPAartfest, showcasing artists and their works, organizers said.

Co-chaired by JJ Singh and Lizzy Conroy, the 2021 MPA Celebration Night will take place at the home of Drs. Victoria and Lonnie Davis. The French gypsy jazz group The Bitter Dose Combo will perform for the guests of the Evening. The artistic group’s tequila sponsor, 21 Seeds Tequila, will also be on hand to offer exclusive cocktails.

The event’s “Luck of the Draw” artistic raffle is a lasting design that offers novice and seasoned art collectors access to over 25 works of art donated by top emerging and established talent that will be exhibiting at MPAartfest.

Each ticket purchased represents a chance to win a work of art (minimum value of $ 150). All proceeds will go to MPAartfest, the annual MPA festival, which will be held this year on October 3 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at McLean Central Park.

To participate in the raffle, purchase tickets to the MPA Night or visit the group’s website at mpaart.org and click on “Celebration Party” under “Events” in the drop-down options bar.

During the draw, all tickets will be drawn. The winners receive a work of art. Individuals do not need to attend the evening to participate.


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MHS group members mentor incoming 6th grade students at kick-off | Local News http://slychi.com/mhs-group-members-mentor-incoming-6th-grade-students-at-kick-off-local-news/ Wed, 25 Aug 2021 05:00:00 +0000 http://slychi.com/mhs-group-members-mentor-incoming-6th-grade-students-at-kick-off-local-news/ MURRAY – Murray Middle School group principal Beth Stribling said she was delighted Monday night to see veterans of the Murray High School group welcome sixth-graders into the fold of the Tiger Band. Stribling has been the director of the MMS group for 35 years and wanted to do something like Monday’s event – which […]]]>

MURRAY – Murray Middle School group principal Beth Stribling said she was delighted Monday night to see veterans of the Murray High School group welcome sixth-graders into the fold of the Tiger Band.

Stribling has been the director of the MMS group for 35 years and wanted to do something like Monday’s event – which was called the “Sixth Grade Band Kickoff” – for quite some time. With the cooperation of MHS Group Director Tim Zeiss and members of his group, they carried it out at the MHS practice ground, followed by some time indoors with each instrument section working in a different classroom. To add some prestige to the event, Stribling asked Neal Bradley, the “voice of the runners,” to announce each of the new sixth graders. As names were called out, many high school students handed over their instruments to new band members.

In the opening announcements, Bradley noted that the Tiger Marching Band won the National Championship in the Bands of America National Walking Competition 44 years ago, and since then have performed in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. and the Orange Bowl Parade. He also mentioned that the Murray High Jazz Band had been selected to perform at the prestigious MidWest International Band Conference, and that the group had also been crowned back-to-back champion at the 2017 and 2018 KMEA (Kentucky Music Educators Association) State Marching Band competitions. .

“Why mention this now when we’re here to celebrate the new members of the Sixth Year group?” Bradley read his script. “Because all of the musicians who have performed at such high levels over that 44-year period all started out as the students we are honoring tonight. They were all beginning musicians like those sixth graders who look forward to an incredible future within the award-winning Murray Tiger Band. “

Stribling said when she told her sixth graders the runners’ voice would announce them, they gasped.

“All those kids said ‘Oh my god!’” Stribling said with a laugh. “You would have thought I said ‘Dick Vitale’.”

“It was an incredible honor to be invited to do something like this,” Bradley said. “I grew up (listening to marching bands). I’ve never been a part of it, but I’ve always enjoyed what they’ve been able to do. I have never really been able to watch what is going on downstairs; I just saw the finished product on the pitch, but it’s amazing. And to join such a great tradition as the Murray High Band, I got to see what the band has accomplished over the past 40 years. And to see these young people take that first step – and who knows what they are going to accomplish? – I know I was very excited to do something like this for them.

Stribling said she always tries new things to make the group experience more special for her students. She recalled that in 1988, the MHS group camp was held at Bethel College and the program began to have “big brothers” and “big sisters” as mentors for new freshmen. Eventually, this type of mentoring caught on all the way up to college level, she said.

“Since coming here, I’ve used high school students to help educate college, and we’ve just fostered this family relationship from grades six to twelve,” said Stribling. “During (the COVID-19 pandemic) I was listening to podcasts and stuff like that just to try and see how other people were handling things, and they were talking about ways to make recruiting really special and to try to get the kids to join the group. They were talking about having activities like sports drafts, and that’s when I started to think about what we could do here. what he transformed into.

“The kickoff of the sixth year was an absolute home run!” Zeiss said. “It was so cool to see the excitement on the faces of the sixth graders and to see the high school students leading the teaching. I really think this will become an annual tradition!

MHS sophomore Rianna Peng plays clarinet for the Tiger Band and described how she felt as she showed sixth graders how to put their new instruments together and start playing.

“I think it’s really cool that we do this because most of the time if you’re in a band it’s a big organization and you might not know everyone, even the people who play. of your instrument, ”she said. “It’s really cool that we can introduce ourselves to these people and maybe help them and get to know them.”

Fern Carron, another second grade clarinetist, said: “I think this is a good opportunity for the sixth grade students, and I’m happy that they are learning older people to practice their instrument.

Ginny Chipman, a sixth-year tuba player, said her older sisters Anna and Kate were also in the group and her father Mike teaches at MHS.

“I’m going to play tuba and joined the band because my sisters were doing it and I thought it would be fun,” she said. “(The presentation) was fun and I can’t wait to learn new songs.”


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Teen drummer publishes digital magazine about living with autism – The Oakland Press http://slychi.com/teen-drummer-publishes-digital-magazine-about-living-with-autism-the-oakland-press/ Mon, 23 Aug 2021 12:21:24 +0000 http://slychi.com/teen-drummer-publishes-digital-magazine-about-living-with-autism-the-oakland-press/ Many musicians stamp their feet to the beat, but Shelby Township drummer Grant Harrison does not. As his peers from Utica’s high school bands casually tap their toes, Harrison nods like a calm heavy metal drummer. Grant, 16, was diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome, a term used to describe a neurodevelopmental disorder on the autism spectrum. […]]]>

Many musicians stamp their feet to the beat, but Shelby Township drummer Grant Harrison does not. As his peers from Utica’s high school bands casually tap their toes, Harrison nods like a calm heavy metal drummer.

Grant, 16, was diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome, a term used to describe a neurodevelopmental disorder on the autism spectrum. The term Asperger’s refers to a person with high level autism, but since 2013 the term has fallen out of favor in the medical community. People with this disease are no longer distinguished from others on the autism spectrum. The characteristics of autism vary from person to person, but generally include repetitive behaviors and social challenges.

Grant, entering his final year of high school in Utica, is doing well in school. He maintains a good grade point average and is part of the school’s wind, jazz, marching and orchestral ensemble. He also plays drums in an after-school social group called The Basement Group, which includes several friends and his younger brother, Bryce.

Grant successfully manages his symptoms – which include anxiety and resulting panic attacks, restlessness, social discomfort, hearing and speech problems, and problems with textures – by redirecting his focus. and other techniques. It’s his hearing loss that makes him bang his head while he plays, says his mother, Tracy.

“Language is difficult for him, and that’s because he hears the way we hear underwater,” she says. “That’s why the drums are perfect because he can feel the beat.”

In addition to positive cognitive support, playing with groups helped Grant manage his anxiety, develop socially, and strengthen his self-esteem.

Grant started playing drums in second grade after Tracy, who played the clarinet, noticed that her son was interested in music. Knowing that other types of instruments may not work for Grant, Tracy encouraged him to try the drums. She hired drum instructor Carol Boufford to work with her son privately, and the two formed a connection that will continue for years to come.

After learning from Bouffard for a short time, Grant expressed interest in performing in the fourth-grade talent show. His performance was so well received by his classmates that he became the “kid who plays the drums”. It was a significant boost to Grant’s self-esteem.

In addition to music, Grant is a longtime member of the BSA Scouts, having recently achieved the rank of Eagle Scout, the Boy Scout’s highest achievement. A requirement of Eagle Scout is the completion of a significant community service project. Grant, who blogged online about his life with autism, published a 26-page digital magazine about his time with the group, “Music Through the Eyes and Ears of Autism.” The purpose of the magazine, which is available online at Grant’s website, FetchTheSwell.com, is to raise awareness about living with autism.

“It’s hard to figure out what it is (to have autism) because it’s more of a mental type of thing than a physical one,” Grant says. “I want to make a change in the community to explain what it is and promote the change.

16-year-old Grant Harrison plays drums in Utica High School groups. He recently published a digital magazine about his life with autism to earn his Eagle Scout badge. Photo by Debra Kaszubski

Grant hopes to continue publishing the digital magazine quarterly. He named the site after a surfer dog’s persistence in riding a wave, which is a metaphor for Grant’s determination to successfully overcome all societal barriers. Grant, who has blogged for several years, has posted numerous articles and photos on his website. Its goal is to show people the human behind the diagnosis.

“You see so much medical stuff, but this is about a kid with good grades and doing well,” says Tracy. “I, as a parent, would have loved to see something like this when Grant was young. “

Find Grant’s work on FetchTheSwell.com. Or, to learn more about autism, visit autismspeaks.org.


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Local history regularly attracts the columnist | Etc http://slychi.com/local-history-regularly-attracts-the-columnist-etc/ Sun, 22 Aug 2021 14:00:00 +0000 http://slychi.com/local-history-regularly-attracts-the-columnist-etc/ Nostalgia must run in my DNA. I’ve always loved history, whether it’s exploring something local or my family’s heritage, which dates back to William the Conqueror of Normandy which, in 1066, crossed the Channel and seized England. It is a constant source of fascination. So when Joe drazan with the Gone project Walla Walla send […]]]>

Nostalgia must run in my DNA. I’ve always loved history, whether it’s exploring something local or my family’s heritage, which dates back to William the Conqueror of Normandy which, in 1066, crossed the Channel and seized England.

It is a constant source of fascination.

So when Joe drazan with the Gone project Walla Walla send news articles, announcements and vintage photos my way, it’s always a chance to dig.

The articles he sent me recently from 1960 onwards are very timely as we approach the Walla Walla County Fair & Frontier Days. See her photos from the 1960’s “From the Vault” parade for August 15th.

Drazan sent me images of the 1960 fair’s program cover, a large concert, and a newspaper article touting the fair’s events from September 1-4 of that year.

The cover of the fair program in red, white and blue includes images of Fairest Farmerette Happy Brother and the flags for two pieces of land on the Pacific which had recently acquired state status. Hawaii was annexed as a US territory in 1898, then in 1959 Alaska and Hawaii, respectively, joined the Union as the 49th and 50th states.

“Jazz Ambassador” Louis “Satchmo” Armstrong made his first appearance in this field as the headliner of the fair on September 1, a move marked by the Southeast Washington Fair Association.

The story of the fair program on Armstrong’s visit with his six-member All-Stars group was “the first time a star of this magnitude has been featured in the traditional opening show,” reported Ed hickey.

Members of the group who traveled with him on his “phenomenally successful” world tours were Trummy Young, “Peanuts” Hucko, Billy Kyle, Danny Barcelona and Death Herbert and singer Velma Middleton.

Armstrong, who celebrated his 60th birthday on July 4, 1960, began playing the trumpet at age 13. The New Orleans native earned his fame performing in jazz bands, radio and nightclubs, movies and concert halls.

The conductor and singer is known for his iconic songs “What a Wonderful World”, “Hello, Dolly”, “Star Dust” and “La Vie En Rose”.

The capacity audience followed his performances across Europe, in Moscow, Tokyo and the countries of East Asia. He has earned the gratitude of the U.S. government as a goodwill ambassador, Hickey noted.

“Critics hail him not only as the greatest figure in the jazz world today, but as ‘one of the most extraordinary creative geniuses all music has ever known,'” the article states.

Brotherton was crowned Queen during Armstrong’s appearance and thereafter, Si Zentner’s Band played music for dancing in the exhibition building.

September 1 opened with cloudless skies and a reported warm sun Doug Blessing in the UB on September 1st. He said a stream of schoolchildren by the hundreds gathered at the fairgrounds in the early afternoon for Children’s Day. Also of note, the UB was in its 92nd year in 1960.


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Wilco’s bassist embraced his midcoast community, and vice versa http://slychi.com/wilcos-bassist-embraced-his-midcoast-community-and-vice-versa/ Sun, 22 Aug 2021 08:00:23 +0000 http://slychi.com/wilcos-bassist-embraced-his-midcoast-community-and-vice-versa/ When Wilco’s bassist John Stirratt heard that a group of people from the Mid-Coast were trying to restore the 1930s-era Waldo Theater in Waldoboro, he wanted to help. Stirratt and his wife had moved to the area a few years earlier, full time, and they wanted to get involved in their new community. Stirratt offered […]]]>

When Wilco’s bassist John Stirratt heard that a group of people from the Mid-Coast were trying to restore the 1930s-era Waldo Theater in Waldoboro, he wanted to help.

Stirratt and his wife had moved to the area a few years earlier, full time, and they wanted to get involved in their new community. Stirratt offered to perform a 2018 benefit show in Waldoboro, along with the Maine Youth Rock Orchestra and other local bands. The show raised over $ 30,000 for the restoration project.

Maine folks who know Stirratt and his family say his low-key demeanor and desire to get involved in the community makes it hard to imagine he’s a rock star. But as the original member of the influential rock band Wilco, founded in 1994, there is no doubt that he is.

“When you first meet John, you just think there’s no way anyone could be this nice,” said Keri Lupien from Waldoboro, chairman of the board of the Waldo Theater. “She’s a really modest person who really cares about this community.”

Stirratt will have a relatively short commute – as far as rock star travel goes – when he and Wilco perform at Thompson’s Point in Portland on Wednesday. The group recently embarked on a nationwide tour which was due to take place last year but was delayed by the pandemic.

Stirratt, who moved to the center of the coast from Chicago, said he found Maine an “incredible place” to hide as COVID-19 crippled other parts of the country. He enjoys being near the ocean and appreciates the maritime history of the region. He said he and his wife got involved with the Waldo Theater because they wanted to support the effort to restore and rejuvenate a community focal point. His wife, Crissy, is a member of the theater board.

“It’s a really cool and important art deco theater for people here so we really wanted to help in any way we could,” said Stirratt, 53.

John Stirratt, right on guitar, was part of a 2018 Waldoboro concert to benefit the restoration of the Waldo Theater. Photo by Liz Hayford, photography by Windy Hill

THE MAINE ROUTE

Stirratt lives “near Damariscotta” but said he preferred not to name the town in particular to protect his family’s privacy. They moved to Maine to be closer to his wife’s parents, who had also moved to the Midcoast area.

Stirratt grew up in New Orleans, where both of his parents were amateur musicians. Her father performed in Dixieland and standard jazz groups, while her mother sang traditional country music. He said he fell into music largely because his house had closets full of instruments.

“As a kid I would find instruments put away, open cases and find a 1950s Gibson (guitar) or banjo,” Stirratt said. He said growing up in New Orleans allowed him to enjoy a wide range of music, from jazz and blues to rock and country.

He went to the University of Mississippi, where he joined a group called The Hilltops, which also included his twin sister. With The Hilltops and other bands he performed in college and throughout the South East in the late 1980s. It was then that he met members of the influential band from alternative country Uncle Tupelo, starring future Wilco frontman Jeff Tweedy.

Stirratt said that he and his band mates at the time decided to call Uncle Tupelo’s management and ask if they could open for the best-known band at some point, and so Uncle Tupelo has booked a concert in Mississippi. He kept in touch with Tweedy and his comrades and, in 1992, joined them as bassist and guitarist. Although the band did not enjoy great commercial success, they did help inspire an alternative country sound among many other bands in the ’80s and’ 90s.

Wilco bassist John Stirratt has lived in Maine with his family for about five years. Photo by Zoran Orlic

In 1994, Uncle Tupelo broke up, with Tweedy, Stirratt and other members forming Wilco. Two others, Jay Farrar and Mike Heidorn, left to form Son Volt. Today, Tweedy, who writes most of the songs, and Stirratt are the only original Wilco members still in the group.

Stirratt said he first fell in love with Maine in the early 1990s, when Uncle Tupelo performed in a concert at Bowdoin College in Brunswick. His positive outlook on the state was cemented, he said, when Wilco performed a show in Camden in the late 1990s. He recalls stopping by Moody’s Diner in Waldoboro after the show, on the way back to Boston.

Stirratt’s wife had spent summers in Maine as a child. So when her parents moved to Maine for good a few years ago, it was an easy decision to move near them, Stirratt said. They lived in Chicago for many years but had often thought about moving to Maine. Stirratt is an avid sailor and enjoys fishing and hiking.

BE ABLE TO STAY

When asked about Wilco’s long-term success, along with different generations of fans, Stirratt immediately points to Tweedy. The group has built a large and loyal fan base while influencing many other alternative rock musicians over the past 27 years. The band have won Grammys – including Best Alternative Music Album for “A Ghost is Born” in 2004 – and have their own annual music and art festival, Solid Sound in North Adams, Massachusetts, with the next scheduled. for May.

“First and foremost is Jeff’s restless and relentless creativity,” Stirratt said. “Jeff writes the songs because he never lacks quality material.”

Maine resident John Stirratt, far right, and the rest of his group mates in Wilco, including Jeff Tweedy, front and center, will play at Thompson’s Point in Portland on Wednesday. Photo by Annabel Mehran

Wilco’s current tour is to support his 2019 album “Ode To Joy” which features straightforward songs with acoustic guitars and lyrics about staying positive through tough times. Rolling Stone called it the band’s best recording in years and a “beautiful exercise in discouraged elevation.” The song “Love is everywhere (Attention)” has a simple message – that love is everywhere, despite the violence and turmoil of the world around us:

“Where the sunlight catches the lake / It’s frozen in flames / Under the sleepy town / With the riots raining down / It’s all yours now / It’s all for you / Now, now / The love is everywhere. “

The song “Everyone Hides”, although upbeat in tempo, has a slightly darker theme, that no one is exactly as it seems, not even yourself: “If You’re Selling Yourself On A Vision / A Dream Of Who you are / An idea of ​​how it should be / And a wish on a star / Remember, remember, it can’t be denied, everyone is hiding. “

Stirratt said he thought the songs on “Ode to Joy” were Tweedy’s attempt to find some optimism during a “dark and divisive time” in our country’s history.

“I think it’s still relevant now. There are flashes of light, and he’s trying to remind people of that with a song like ‘Love is Everywhere’, ”Stirratt said.

Besides his work at Wilco, Stirratt played in another band, The Autumn Defense, for about 20 years with his friend and compatriot Pat Sansone, originally from New Orleans. Stirratt gets more into songwriting in The Autumn Defense and explores different sounds including late ’60s British pop.

Stirratt said he was eager to start a tour with Wilco after a long layoff due to the pandemic, but admits he’s not sure what the experience will be like.

“We’re in uncharted territory right now, things can change so quickly. But we’re just super excited to go out and play and make things as safe as possible for people, ”Stirratt said.

He is especially happy to play an outdoor show at Thompson’s Point, which has a large grassy area on the Fore River. He has fond memories of playing there on a “glorious night” about four years ago.

“The sunsets are really beautiful there,” Stirratt said.


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All that jazz and more at the Center Stage Theater http://slychi.com/all-that-jazz-and-more-at-the-center-stage-theater/ Wed, 11 Aug 2021 12:29:00 +0000 http://slychi.com/all-that-jazz-and-more-at-the-center-stage-theater/ COURTESY IMAGE DAVE MASON / NEWS-PRESS Christy Pastence meets Moutaz, on a park bench in Central Park in “Breaking the Code”, a romantic comedy which will be performed on August 28 at the Center Stage Theater. This month, the Center Stage Theater presents a jazz and blues concert, ballet troupe and romantic comedy. The theater […]]]>

You’ll find everything from blues and jazz to ballet and a romantic comedy this month at the Center Stage Theater, upstairs in Paseo Nuevo.

You can purchase tickets at centerstagetheater.org.

Members of the public will be required to wear masks at all times in the Santa Barbara Theater.

Here is a schedule.

SATURDAY

The Youth Blues & Jazz Band will perform during the “Back-to-school concert for a cause” at 6:45 pm

Tickets cost $ 20 for general admission and are free for ages 17 and under.

Proceeds will be donated to the Turner Foundation Music & Imagination Program, an after-school program for students.

To learn more about TFMI, visit www.theturnerfoundation.com.

AOT. 27

Ballet22 will present “The Best of Ballet22” at 7pm

The show will include clips from “Carmen”, Ramon Olier’s critically acclaimed ballet, as well as segments from “Giselle” and “Le Corsaire”. There will also be contemporary works by choreographers Joshua Stayton, Jehbreal Jackson and Myles Thatcher.

Ballet22 was launched in 2020 to explore what is possible in ballet by breaking gender stereotypes and empowering LGBTQ + artists and audiences.

Tickets cost from $ 23 to $ 103.

AOT. 28

Claudia Hoag Mcgarry will present “Breaking the Code” at 3pm and 7pm

The play is about Christy Pastence, a somewhat lonely 50-year-old playwright and widow living in New York’s Upper West. One day, she meets Moutaz, a young Pakistani-American, on a park bench in Central Park.

The production stars Shelly Best, Gul Saeed, Heather Terbell, Claire Waterhouse, Shari Howard and Marlene Matosian.

“Breaking the Code” is directed by Jordana Lawrence. Music is by Ashley Jones and Paul McGarry.

Tickets cost $ 20 for general admission, $ 18 for students, and $ 15 for students.

You can follow Center Stage Theater on social media @centerstagetheatersb or Facebook @ CenterStage SB.

e-mail: dmason@newspress.com


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Hiromi, Terence Blanchard, Keith Tippett & More: Jazz Week http://slychi.com/hiromi-terence-blanchard-keith-tippett-more-jazz-week/ Mon, 09 Aug 2021 11:57:43 +0000 http://slychi.com/hiromi-terence-blanchard-keith-tippett-more-jazz-week/ The Week in Jazz is your roundup of new and remarkable stories from the world of jazz. It’s a one-stop destination for the music news you need to know. Let’s take it from the top. Remarkable Terence Blanchard is releasing a new single: Trumpeter Terence Blanchard released second single from his upcoming album Absence, which […]]]>

The Week in Jazz is your roundup of new and remarkable stories from the world of jazz. It’s a one-stop destination for the music news you need to know. Let’s take it from the top.

Remarkable

Terence Blanchard is releasing a new single: Trumpeter Terence Blanchard released second single from his upcoming album Absence, which will be released on August 27 via Blue Note and pays homage to legendary composer / saxophonist Wayne Shorter. The single is a new take on Shorter’s “Fall”, which first appeared on the seminal Miles Davis Quintet album. Nefertiti from 1967. Absence is one of ten albums that we highlighted in our list of LPs released this month that you must know. Check out the full list here.

Opening of a new documentary on free jazz in New York and Los Angeles: Fire music, a new documentary retracing the birth and influence of free jazz, will be released in New York at the Film Forum on September 10 and in Los Angeles at Laemmle Glendale on September 17 with a national release to follow. The film, which was warmly received at the New York Film Festival, features exclusive performance footage and interviews and counts Nels Cline and Thurston Moore as its executive producers. Learn more about Fire music.

Kurt Elling shares a new single: Kurt Elling shared a new single from SuperBlue, his next album with Charlie Hunter and Corey Fonville and DJ Harrison, members of Butcher Brown. The disc will be released on October 8 and you can pre-order it HERE. “Endless Lawns” is a reimagined version of a tune that originally appeared on Elling’s 2018 album, Questions. “We recorded this a few years ago with Branford Marsalis,” Elling recalls via a press release. “But I knew there was more to this line-up for our fun, so I asked Charlie and the boys to give me a different groove here and they sure did.”

Lionel Loueke 2018 Vinyl-Only Standards Album gets CD and digital reissue: The famous LP 2018 from guitar master Lionel Loueke, only in vinyl, Close your eyes, will be available on CD and digitally for the first time via Sounderscore on October 22. Originally released via Newvelle, this album was Loueke’s debut standards album and also features bassist Ruben Rogers and drummer Eric Harlan. The new edition includes three bonus tracks, one of which is the “Countdown” trio version of saxophone legend John Coltrane.

Craft Latino will release the Massive Fania Records box set: Craft Latino will release a massive new collection of Fania Records singles released between 1965 and 1975 on October 8. The set is titled It’s A Good, Good Feeling: The Latin Soul of Fania Records (The Singles). It includes four CDs, as well as a bonus 7-inch single, all housed in a 60-page book, containing new cover notes, photos and more. The 89 singles compiled come from artists such as Ray Barretto, Joe Bataan, Larry Harlow and more, as well as rarities from 125th Street Candy Store, The Latinaires, The Harvey Averne Band and Ali Baba, among others. Pre-order it here.

Jazz Promotion Network announces its annual conference: The Jazz Promotion Network, the only UK and Irish network of creators and industry professionals specifically dedicated to jazz, has announced that its annual conference will take place November 19-20 as part of this year’s EFG London Jazz Festival. year. The conference will take place from the UK capital and will be available online. It will include industry roundtables, presentations, artist showcases and networking opportunities. Click here to find out more.

Habibi Funk publishes a new compilation: On August 6, Habibi Funk released an eclectic new compilation of Egyptian organ funk, Moroccan disco, Libyan reggae, soundtrack music from Algeria, Lebanese protest music and more. The compilation is called An Eclectic Selection of Music from the Arab World Part 2 and a statement explains that it “is not intended to serve as a historical reflection of popular music from North Africa and the Middle East, but more to reflect the personal tastes of the label”. Order compilation HERE. You can also find out more about Habibi Funk by listening to our podcast chat with its founder Jannis Stürtz via the player below.

Six new directors join Jazz North’s board of directors: Jazz North, the development agency for jazz in the north of England, has announced the appointment of six new directors to join its dynamic board. They are musicians Perrilena Alleyne Hughes, Richard Henry, Jilly Jarman and Dennis Rollins, web developer and CMS specialist Jeni Tehan and communications consultant Jon Beck. The new directors will help Jazz North shape the future of the organization as it navigates a new landscape of live music. Learn more about Jazz Nord HERE.

Album announcements

Hiromi, Silver Lining Suite (Telarc): Hiromi, who recently performed at the opening ceremony of the Tokyo Olympics, will be released Silver Lining Suite, a breathtaking mix of jazz invention and classical composition, on October 8 via Telar. Inspired by the difficult times of the pandemic, the project combines Hiromi’s virtuoso and emotional piano with a string quartet assembled by violinist Tatsuo Nishie, principal violin of the New Japan Philharmonic. Watch Hiromi’s teaser video for Silver Lining Suite via the player below and pre-order the album HERE.

Leon Lee Dorsey, Mike Clarke and Manuel Valera, Liberty Jazz Band (Avenue du Jazz 1): Jazz Freedom Dance is the fourth collaboration between bassist Leon Lee Dorsey and drummer Mike Clarke, also featuring special guest Manuel Valera on piano. The record, released on August 20 via Jazz Avenue 1, pays homage to Puerto Rican-born Latin jazz and bebop master Hilton Ruiz, with whom Dorsey performed regularly in his later years.

Sam Blakeslee and the melancholy thought, The long middle (Outside in): New York trombonist Sam Blakeslee released The long middle, an intimate chamber jazz record featuring his dynamic ensemble Wistful Thinking. The LP is described via a press release as an introspective journey of pastoral melodies and beautifully crafted compositions and arrangements. The long middle is now available through Outside In Music and you can order it HERE.

Sacha Dobson, Conversation between girls (self-published): On September 10, singer / songwriter / multi-instrumentalist Sasha Dobson will be released Conversation between girls. Described as his most personal recording to date, the album features ten tracks of original compositions and enduring favorites performed with a core trio and guest artist Peter Bernstein on guitar, unveiling Dobson’s intrinsic fascination with spontaneity. and the tradition of the resonant bebop. Pre-order it here.

Live music and festival news

Program Announcement for the 25th Other Minds New Music Festival: The program for the 25th Other Minds Festival Festival of New Music was announced last week by its artistic director Charles Amirkhanian. This year’s edition is captioned “Moment’s Notice” and will take place over four evenings October 14-17 at the Taube Atrium Theater in the San Francisco War Memorial Building. The lineup will include performances by Ambrose Akinmusire, Anthony Braxton, Mary Halvorson and Tyshawn Sorey; Jen Shyu, Wadada Leo Smith and Zeena Parkins; Roscoe Mitchell and many others. Each concert will be preceded an hour earlier by a round table on stage with the festival artists. Click here for more information and tickets.

A two-day star-studded event celebrates Keith Tippett in Bristol, UK: 38 musicians from around the world will come together in ten groups for two days of music to celebrate the legacy of prolific and eclectic pianist / composer Keith Tippett. The two-day star-studded event will take place on October 1-2 in her hometown of Bristol, UK. Click here for more information and tickets. Tippett was one of Britain’s most influential jazz artists for over half a century and passed away last year at the age of 72.

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Keywords:
Butcher Brown, Charlie Hunter, Habibi Funk, Hiromi, Keith Tippett, Kurt Elling, Leon Lee Dorsey, Lionel Loueke, Manuel Valera, Mike Clarke, Sam Blakeslee, Sasha Dobson, Terence Blanchard, Wayne Shorter


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Enjoy the free summer concert “Music on the Green” in Mariposa on August 13th and 14th, 2021 http://slychi.com/enjoy-the-free-summer-concert-music-on-the-green-in-mariposa-on-august-13th-and-14th-2021/ Fri, 06 Aug 2021 21:23:45 +0000 http://slychi.com/enjoy-the-free-summer-concert-music-on-the-green-in-mariposa-on-august-13th-and-14th-2021/ August 6, 2021 – The next member of the Music on the Green lineup is folk duo Annie and Rene based in the Tahoe area. Friday August 13 will be their debut album Music on the Green. This singer / songwriter collaboration is inspired by folk and blues traditions and is sure to be a […]]]>

August 6, 2021 – The next member of the Music on the Green lineup is folk duo Annie and Rene based in the Tahoe area. Friday August 13 will be their debut album Music on the Green. This singer / songwriter collaboration is inspired by folk and blues traditions and is sure to be a moving performance.

The folk duo Annie and René will perform on Friday August 13

On Saturday August 14, Music on the Green welcomes the return of the jazz group Blue Skies Trio. With Kevin McHatten behind the drums, Greg Enis on keyboards and a spinning bassist, the sound of jazz music will engulf Mariposa County Art Park!

Blue sky trioJazz band Blue Skies Trio will perform on Saturday August 14

A full schedule of talents that will perform throughout this summer season can be found at MariposaArtsCouncil.org. Tips for artists will be solicited, encouraged and appreciated. All performances begin at 7:00 p.m. (unless otherwise noted) at Mariposa County Art Park, located on the highway. 140, between 4e and 5e Streets in historic downtown Mariposa, CA. Parking is available along the 5e Rue and the lower 5e Street parking for an accessible pedestrian path through the entrance to Mariposa Creek Parkway.

The artwork for Music on the Green is created by student artist, Autumn Stock. Autumn can be contacted for a commission by email autumn.stock.art@gmail.com.

The shows are free to the public thanks to the generous support of our sponsors: Yosemite Mariposa Tourism Bureau, Ranch Fence, Mariposa-Yosemite Rotary Club, Carol Johnson, James Wittkopf, Mariposa Museum & History Center, Yosemite Pilates, Sticks Coffee, Savoury’s, Mountain Yoga Studio, Fremont House, Mariposa Pizza Factory, Starchman & Bryant Avocats, Foster Ace Hardware, Mariposa Shipping, Sierra Gold Cleaning, Mariposa Lodge of Odd Fellows # 39, Saralynn Nusbaum & Don Melcher, Dave & Terry Rozelle, Dog Grooming par Tess, Sue Overstreet, Dewey Family Trust, Meadow Creek Ranch B&B, Restful Nest B&B, Ladybug embroidery and clothing printing.

Those interested in supporting the Arts Council are encouraged to become members at MariposaArtsCouncil.org/join.

The Arts Council is an incorporated non-profit organization created to promote and support all forms of cultural arts, for all ages, throughout Mariposa County and is supported in part by Mariposa County, the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency, and the California Arts Council, a state agency.

Music on the 2021 green program

Source: Mariposa Arts Council


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The Bix pays homage to jazz legend Davenport http://slychi.com/the-bix-pays-homage-to-jazz-legend-davenport/ Fri, 06 Aug 2021 14:38:39 +0000 http://slychi.com/the-bix-pays-homage-to-jazz-legend-davenport/ Bix Beiderbecke. (photo courtesy of Bix Jazz Society.) After last year’s 49th annual event went virtual due to the pandemic, the Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Jazz Festival is celebrating its golden anniversary with live music in person this weekend in Davenport. Steve Trainor, president of the Bix Jazz Society, said their 50th festival kicked off last […]]]>

Bix Beiderbecke. (photo courtesy of Bix Jazz Society.)

After last year’s 49th annual event went virtual due to the pandemic, the Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Jazz Festival is celebrating its golden anniversary with live music in person this weekend in Davenport.

Steve Trainor, president of the Bix Jazz Society, said their 50th festival kicked off last night and features five concerts of five hours each over three days with all-American programming.

“We have them from Denver, Minneapolis, Toledo, St. Louis, Chicago, Des Moines,” Trainor says. “So a total of eight professional groups, two of which are star groups from some of the other groups, then the ninth is our Bix Beiderbecke Youth Band.”

Bix, a native of Davenport, was a pioneer of cornet and piano jazz nearly a century ago, who died at the age of 28 in 1931. His music remains popular around the world and the festival has, in the pre-COVID era, attracted Bix enthusiasts from as far away as Australia, Japan and Europe. For this 50th year however, Trainor says a lot fewer people are traveling.

Des Moines Jazz Group NOLA. (photo courtesy of the Bix Jazz Society)

“Years and years ago there wasn’t what we call the Internet and we didn’t have a festival every other weekend,” says Trainor. “We had 10,000 people in the park, sometimes more. We average around 3,000 (per day) and we have to be happy with that, especially considering last year. We can’t wait to see real people and hear real music.

Every effort is made, he says, to make sure this year’s festival is a * safe * festival.
“There is no mask warrant at this point in the state of Iowa, but we have masks that we can give to people,” Trainor said. “We have seats for two, seats for four, and you can stretch out because there are about 700 seats. There are hand hygiene stations.

Most concerts take place at the Rhythm City Casino event center in North Davenport, although a few select shows are presented at the Putnam Museum and Oakdale Cemetery, where Bix is ​​buried. Fans will also want to visit the Bix Museum on the lower level of the River musical experience in downtown Davenport.

It is dedicated to telling the story of the hometown hero through recordings, photos, videos, storyboards, letters and his instruments.


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Concert Review: Newport Jazz Festival 2021 – A Musical Affirmation http://slychi.com/concert-review-newport-jazz-festival-2021-a-musical-affirmation/ Tue, 03 Aug 2021 12:30:04 +0000 http://slychi.com/concert-review-newport-jazz-festival-2021-a-musical-affirmation/ By Paul Robicheau Both Newport festivals have taken on the challenge of restoring live music in a year that has made it difficult and welcome. Charles Lloyd at the Newport Jazz Festival, 2012. Photo: Paul Robicheau. Nine out of ten days of music at Fort Adams State Park culminated in Sunday’s finale of the three-day […]]]>

By Paul Robicheau

Both Newport festivals have taken on the challenge of restoring live music in a year that has made it difficult and welcome.

Charles Lloyd at the Newport Jazz Festival, 2012. Photo: Paul Robicheau.

Nine out of ten days of music at Fort Adams State Park culminated in Sunday’s finale of the three-day Newport Jazz Festival, as Andra Day cooed and soared through her affirmative ‘Rise Up’ hymn. And while the previous Folk On fest covered a lot of ground over six days, the jazz weekend turned out to be more diverse, from the crowd – which seemed larger despite the same half-capacity with proof of vaccination or negative Covid test. – to the range of what constituted jazz. .

Friday featured the slightly exotic psych-funk of popular but polarizing Texan trio Khruangbin (last seen at Newport Folk in 2018) as well as the intoxicating sax booms of Kamasi Washington, which draws its own young audience. Saturday was dominated by the lively New Orleans outfit Trombone Shorty & New Orleans Avenue as well as soul icon and Newport Folk favorite, Mavis Staples, who served the Talking Heads “Slippery People” as well as the Staples Singers fare with his husky, authoritative voice.

Sunday was the last day to sell the Port Peninsula, but carried its own punch – and diversity in style and sound. The day calmed down with less emphasized jazz instruments, harpist Brandee Younger with glissando accents and a compromise of atmosphere with Joel Ross, Warren Wolf and Sasha Berliner. Ross also colored the sound of the Jazz Gallery All-Stars, which included impressive tours by pianist Gerald Clayton and singer Renee Neufville, which paid a moving tribute to the late Roy Hargrove. Pianist Kenny Barron and bassist Dave Holland brought supple and nimble acoustic jazz in a trio before David Ostwald’s Louis Armstrong Eternity Band revived the era of jazz early in its inspiration, down to tuba and banjo. .

Tuba also lent the background to the more contemporary Bogie Band. This 10-member group set off a byte of winds from players who had worked with the Dap Kings, David Byrne’s American Utopia, Antibalas and Almost Dead, the performers of Grateful Dead whose drummer / frontman Joe Russo was at the center of the Bogie gang. From multiple flute waves to surging funk with muscular horns, the band kicked ass.

Andra Day at the Newport Jazz Festival, 2021. Photo: Paul Robicheau.

Russo also joined the Jam Jawn, a promising improvisation session led by bassist and festival artistic director Christian McBride. Guitarist John Scofield relaxed a bit too much, carving rubbery notes over Russo’s simpatico chatter and Almost Dead’s Marco Benevento, which stood out on several keys. While the Jawn wasn’t a yawn, it lacked inspiring turns beyond players wandering into a few riffs they then exaggerated. Better times came when the band cut for a slow weave of McBride’s acoustic bass and Mikaela Davis’ harp and when McBride went electric to grease a funky blast with guests from Ostwald’s Armstrong band. .

Charles Lloyd – who first performed in Newport five decades ago – hasn’t announced his band ahead of time, but he usually puts together a sublime cast, shaped by the earthy tone and mood of his saxophone. tenor. Sunday was no different, with pianist Clayton, rock drummer Eric Harland and guitarist Marvin Sewell performing sweetly spicy solos, off the beaten track slide and biting blues.

Christian McBride with George Wein at the Newport Jazz Festival. Photo: Paul Robicheau.

Robert Glasper performed every day of Newport Jazz as the festival’s artist-in-residence, from the acoustic piano combo to his band Black Radio, which generated Sunday’s hottest fusion. Glasper switched from Fender Rhodes to synthesizers as the intensity increased from the groove, topped off by electrifying guitar turns from Isiah Sharkey (D’Angelo, John Mayer). The keyboardist also shared his R&B / hip-hop side, inviting Grammy winner Ledisi, who brought her dynamic vocals to a few collaborative songs (including “I’m Leaving You” from an upcoming revamp of Miles Davis’ titles) following her tribute to Nina Simone on Saturday.

Andra Day also dove into Simone’s songbook Sunday with an overly smooth “Mississippi Goddam”, but resonated more with the singer’s songs she recently performed in the acclaimed film. The United States vs. Billie Holiday. She started the set with “Strange Fruit” (on manila-shaped drums) and tucked into “God Bless the Child” after giving away vacation props to write this song at a time when “her agency gave her. has been removed “. Day also shone with songs from his stellar debut in 2015. Long live the fall (notably “Forever Mine”) and his next album, offering the lively “Phone Dies” (dancing with his choristers) and the R&B ballad “Heavy on My Mind”, airy for its title. “You showed you stood up,” Day told the crowd in reference to the pandemic – and Newport festivals rose to the challenge of restoring live music in a year that made it difficult and welcome.

Newport Jazz founder George Wein, 95, unfortunately couldn’t attend the festival this year, but McBride pulled out his cell phone to call Wein, turned it to face the crowd. and held up a microphone so Wein could speak. “Keep coming back,” Wein said, thanking the fans and wiping a tear from his eyes.


Paul Robicheau served over 20 years as a contributing editor for music at Incorrect Bostonian in addition to writing and photography for the Boston Globe, Rolling stone, and many other publications. He was also the founding artistic editor of Boston subway.


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